from jane austen to applebee’s…

Good morning my dear friends.  It has been too long.  I’ve missed writing and sharing with you.  Between a new job, school, family, and a host of life commitments, I’ve neglected a fancy farm girl.  I’m not done here, though.  Talking with you this morning is like wrapping up in my favorite cozy sweater; familiar and comforting.  So read on about my kiddos and Jane.

February 11,2017

Tonight I’m taking my kids to see a play.  We are going to see an adaptation of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility at the Fort Smith Little Theater.  As some of you know, Jane Austen is my favorite author.  I listen to or read Pride and Prejudice every year, usually in the fall.  Don’t ask me why.  I’m not sure to tell you the reasoning. Maybe it’s because I love autumn the best and mixing two of my favorites together makes sense to me?   Maybe that’s when I first read it and my brain is programmed to it being one year exactly?   Who knows.  Getting off subject here.  The play.  How did I ever get my teenagers to actually agree to go see an 18th-century author’s play?

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For me, growing up in rural America was somewhat limiting on cultural experiences.  I have this memory from when I was maybe eight years old.

Dad and I were in his pickup driving down in the pasture.  We were bumping along every so slowly through the field, heading towards the wooded area, looking for a specific cow that had probably given birth.  The why part of this memory is a little fuzzy, but my memory of beautiful classical music emanating from the tape player isn’t.  I can tell you the music playing was Bolero. Of course, I didn’t know who it was then but the music is highly recognizable and I learned later. What I remember best is how the music felt. It was as if we were travelers and as each stanza repeated a little louder, bolder, we got closer to our destination.  I remember how I closed my eyes and let the breeze surround me along with the beautiful notes of music.  The cow, the search, the smells of the country were all just a backdrop.  It was the music.  In the middle of an Oklahoma cow pasture, Bolero was filtering out on the breeze from an old farm truck’s tape deck. It was so cool and a love of classical music was born. 

I still love classical music so I play it when I’m cleaning house or even now while I’m typing this.  The kids have been exposed to it since birth.  Bach for Breakfast, Mozart, and Cello Wars on Pandora are frequently heard at our house.  We have taken in trips to the museums within driving distance of Fort Smith a few times, and we went to the symphony once.  What I’m saying is, the kids like me haven’t had a lot of exposure to the arts, but I’ve tried to give them a little bit.  It’s up to them to decide if they like it.

 

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me, Emma, Cole’s best friend Montana, Cole

 

 

March 10, 2017

The kids really seemed to like the play if the conversations had afterward were any indication.  We discussed the plot, character development, costumes, props, and actors over appetizers at Applebee’s until late.  From Jane Austen to Applebees’s, what a leap.  Decidedly Willoughby’s behavior was deplorable to all those present.  Eleanor should have never remained silent, and Edward was a wimp. Shakespeare’s sonnet made no sense, and why did Marianne have to take walks when it was going to rain?  I think they were paying attention at least.

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I love my kids.  My hope for them is to enjoy the arts and appreciate them from their own unique perspectives with an open mind and sense of humor.  We may be there.

 

Daisies, Coffee, and Chocolates,

holly

 

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